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Summer Reading 

Hello!  I hope you are all enjoying the summer, in addition to reading a little.  Below you'll find summer reading assignments listed for AP Language and Composition.  Please join the Schoology AP Language Summer Reading Course. This will give you access to e-text versions of the novels, the Annotation Guide for AP Language, Gatsby Discussion Questions, and related links. If you have any questions about the assigned readings, please message me on Schoology or send an email to storym@btcs.org.

 

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

SUMMER READING 2016, Mrs. story

Schoology Code: 62X58-MXKMD

 

THE GREAT GATSBY

1. Read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  This happens to be one of my favorite novels, not just because of the story, but the beauty of the language.  I look forward to sharing the experience of reading this novel with you at the beginning of the semester.

2. Annotate the novel.  You may do this as you read it through, or you may choose to go back through the novel a second time and annotate it.  Some students prefer annotating the novel afterwards so that they can experience the novel the first time through for pleasure and to get an overall impression of the story.  Please annotate the novel per the Annotation Guide for AP Language.  This will be a 100 point quiz grade.

3. Prepare to write an argumentative essay.  The first week of class, I will assign you a timed, in-class argumentative essay related to Fitzgerald's portrayal of the American Dream in the novel.  For this purpose, as you read the novel, make note what you believe Fitzgerald is arguing about the American Dream.  The essay will be a 100 point test grade.   

4. Preview the Discussion Questions.  At the beginning of the semester, I will divide you into groups for a discussion of the novel.  You may preview the questions on Schoology, but know that you will only be responsible for the questions assigned to your group; you will not have to answer all of them.  The questions and discussion will be a 100 point homework/classwork grade.

INTO THE WILD

1.  Read Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.  This book is presented as truth in the form of a biography, but Krakauer must speculate the specifics of what happened to Chris McCandless.  So, in one way, this book is an argument about what Krakauer believes about McCandless.  Thematically, this ties into the American Dream, but McCandless responds to that idea in a radically different way than Jay Gatsby. 

2. Annotate the novel.  Please annotate the novel per the attached Annotation Guide for AP LanguageThis will be a 100 point quiz grade.

3. Prepare to write an argumentative essay.  The third week of class, I will assign you a timed, in-class argumentative essay related to Krakauer's portrayal of McCandless.  For this purpose, as you read the novel, make note of the arguments you believe Krakauer is making about McCandless and his reaction to the American Dream.  The essay will be a 100 point test grade.   

4. Into the Wild Discussion Post.  Krakauer was inspired by the Transcendentalist writers Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson. The third week of school you will read excerpts by each writer and create a discussion post answering the following prompt: Choose a quote or summarize an idea from one of the excerpts by Emerson or Thoreau.  Explain what you think it means.  Then say how you believe McCandless interpreted the idea. This will be a 100 point homework/classwork grade.